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Where To Buy Quercetin



Flavonoids, such as quercetin, are antioxidants. They scavenge particles in the body known as free radicals which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals. They may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage free radicals cause. In test tubes, quercetin has strong antioxidant properties. But researchers are not sure whether taking quercetin (and many other antioxidants) has the same effects inside the body.




where to buy quercetin



In test tubes, quercetin prevents immune cells from releasing histamines, which are chemicals that cause allergic reactions. As a result, researchers think that quercetin may help reduce symptoms of allergies, including runny nose, watery eyes, hives, and swelling of the face and lips. However, there is no evidence yet that it works in humans.


Test tube, animal, and some population-based studies suggest that the flavonoids quercetin, resveratrol, and catechins (all found in high concentrations in red wine) may help reduce the risk of atherosclerosis, plaque build up in arteries that can lead to heart attack or stroke. These nutrients appear to protect against the damage caused by LDL (bad) cholesterol and may help prevent death from heart disease. However, most human studies have looked at flavonoids in the diet, not as supplements. Animal studies have used extremely large amounts of flavonoids (more than you could get through a supplement). More studies in people are needed to see if flavonoid supplements can be effective.


Test tube studies show that quercetin prevents damage from LDL cholesterol, and population studies show that people who eat diets high in flavonoids have lower cholesterol. One study found that people who took quercetin and an alcohol-free red wine extract (which contains quercetin) had less damage from LDL cholesterol. Another study found that quercetin reduced LDL concentrations in overweight subjects who were at high risk of heart disease. More studies are needed to show whether taking a quercetin supplement will have the same effect.


Two small studies suggested that people with interstitial cystitis might benefit from consuming flavonoids. People with this condition have bladder pain similar to that from a bladder infection, and often experience an urgent need to urinate. In both studies, those who took a supplement containing quercetin appeared to have fewer symptoms. However, the studies included other flavonoids. So it is not known which flavonoid offers the most benefits. More and better designed studies are needed.


Preliminary evidence indicates that quercetin might reduce symptoms of prostatitis, or inflammation of the prostate. One small study found that men who took quercetin experienced fewer symptoms than men who took placebo. More research is needed.


There are reports of people with RA who had fewer symptoms when they switched from a typical Western diet to a vegan diet with lots of uncooked berries, fruits, vegetables, nuts, roots, seeds, and sprouts containing quercetin and other antioxidants. But there is no evidence that the positive effects were due directly to antioxidants, and no evidence that quercetin supplements help treat RA.


Scientists have long considered quercetin, and other flavonoids contained in fruits and vegetables, important in cancer prevention. People who eat more fruits and vegetables tend to have lower risk of certain types of cancer. Animal and test tube studies suggest that flavonoids have anti-cancer properties. Quercetin and other flavonoids have been shown in these studies to inhibit the growth of cancer cells from breast, colon, prostate, ovarian, endometrial, and lung tumors. One study even suggests that quercetin is more effective than resveratrol in terms of inhibiting tumor growth. Another found that frequent intake of quercetin-rich foods was associated with lower lung cancer risk. The association was even stronger among subjects who smoked more than 20 cigarettes daily, and a third suggests that quercetin slows tumor growth in the laboratory (in leukemia cells). More research is needed.


Fruits and vegetables are the primary dietary sources of quercetin, particularly citrus fruits, apples, onions, parsley, sage, tea, and red wine. Olive oil, grapes, dark cherries, and dark berries such as blueberries, blackberries, and bilberries are also high in quercetin and other flavonoids.


Quercetin is generally considered safe. Side effects may include headache and upset stomach. Preliminary evidence suggests that a byproduct of quercetin can lead to a loss of protein function. Very high doses of quercetin may damage the kidneys. You should take periodic breaks from taking quercetin.


Test tube and animal studies suggest that quercetin may enhance the effects of doxorubicin and cisplatin, which are two chemotherapy medications used to treat cancer. In addition, some doctors believe taking antioxidants at the same time as chemotherapy can be harmful, while others believe it can be helpful. In one study, combining quercetin with the anti-tumor drug doxorubicin, increased the drug's beneficial effects on breast cancer cells. In another, taking quercetin alongside cisplatin reduced the medicines' therapeutic effects in ovarian cancer cells. Talk to your oncologist before taking any supplements if you are undergoing chemotherapy.


Chan MM, Mattiacci JA, Hwang HS, Shah A, Fong D. Synergy between ethanol and grape polyphenols, quercetin, and resveratrol, in the inhibition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway. Bio Pharm. 2000;60(10):1539-48.


Dower JI, Geleijnse JM, Gijsbers L, Zock PL, Kromhout D, Hollman PC. Effects of the pure flavonoids epicatechin and quercetin on vascular function and cariometabolic health: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;101(5):914-21.


Harwood M, Danielewska-Nikiel B, Borzelleca JF, Flamm GW, Williams GM, Lines TC. A critical review of the data related to the safety of quercetin and lack of evidence of in vivo toxicity, including lack of genotoxic/carcinogenic properties. Food Chem Toxicol. 2007 Jun 7; [Epub ahead of print]


Kleemann R, Verschuren L, Morrison M, et al. Anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-atherosclerotic effects of quercetin in human in vitro and in vivo models. Atherosclerosis. 2011;218(1):44-52.


I feel so good taking quercetin. I have been taking it for a few months, I have lost 22 lbs. I don't know if it is quercetin that helped me lose, but I sure am happy about. Thank you for a great product!


We've been getting a lot of questions about whether or not we will continue to ship Q Hydration during the Corona Virus outbreak. Our team is healthy and well and we will indeed continue to ship. Should that change we will let you know. We have also been contacted by several of you about a recent article from Macleans Magazine which references quercetin in relation to Covid-19. We do not know the precise nature of this research, nor are we in any way suggesting that quercetin is some kind of miracle cure. We have seen plenty of research that says quercetin is good for your over all health and that's why we make Q Hydration. So be safe and...


Quercetin is a flavonoid (plant pigment) commonly found in dark colored fruits and vegetables. The primary benefit of quercetin is that it possesses potent Antioxidant, Anti-inflammatory, and Anti-histamine properties. *


Background: We evaluated the ability of quercetin, a natural antioxidant formulated in a specific delivery system, to reduce skin inflammation induced by a variety of stimuli, including UV radiation, stimulation with a histamine solution, or contact with chemical irritants. In particular, we tested the soothing and anti-itch effect of Quercevita(), 1% cream for external use, a formulation characterized by a phospholipids-based delivery system.


Conclusion: Quercetin has a skin protective effect against damage caused by a variety of insults, including UV radiation, histamine, or contact with toxic chemical compounds. Indeed, quercetin is able to reduce redness, itching, and inflammation of damaged skin; it may also help restore skin barrier function, increasing hydration, and reducing water loss.


Quercetin is an antioxidant and belongs to a group of plant pigments called flavonoids. It is found naturally in many fruits, vegetables, flowers, bark, and leaves but is not made in the human body. Studies show quercetin may help to protect against many health conditions associated with oxidative stress, including heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer.


Antioxidants neutralize free radicals which can damage our cells, alter DNA and cause cell death. Free radical molecules are often a by-product of pollution, cigarette smoke, sunlight, alcohol consumption, and other environmental toxins. Like other antioxidants, quercetin may help to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation. According to Rice and colleagues, quercetin is relatively more potent compared to other well-known antioxidants like vitamin C or E.


Most people get quercetin from their diet, but quercetin supplements are also available at retail stores without a prescription. When taken as a dietary supplement, experts are not sure if quercetin has the same antioxidant properties against disease as seen in the laboratory or from the plant source.


Researchers have suggested that quercetin, when used as a dietary supplement, may be beneficial against inflammation that may contribute to diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, allergies, diabetes, stomach ulcers, high blood pressure, and to help boost the immune system. Adequate, randomized, controlled trials are lacking for most of these uses. 041b061a72


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